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Report | Environment Massachusetts Research and Policy Center

Turning to the Wind

Wind power continues to grow as a source of clean energy across America. The United States generated 26 times more electricity from wind power in 2014 than it did in 2001. American wind power has already significantly reduced global warming pollution.

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Blog Post

Time to ban the beads | Russell Bassett

We all want our teeth to be clean after brushing, and our bodies to be clean after showering, but did you know the products used in these everyday activities could be harming wildlife? Hundreds of commonly-used household products contain tiny plastic microbeads, which can be a big problem for our environment. 

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Report | Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center

Lighting the Way

Solar energy is booming. In just the last three years, America’s solar photovoltaic capacity tripled. America’s solar energy revolution continues to be led by a small group of states that have the greatest amount of solar energy capacity installed per capita. These 10 states have opened the door for solar energy and are reaping the rewards as a result.

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News Release | Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center

Global warming “game-changers” will slash emissions, boost Massachusetts’ economy

Massachusetts can rapidly cut its carbon emissions by embracing ten “game-changing” opportunities, and local businesses are poised to benefit, according to two reports released today by the Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center.

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Report | Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center

Cool Solutions

Massachusetts has made great progress in reducing its contribution to global warming over the past decade. Despite this progress, however, Massachusetts is not yet on track to hit our 2020 target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions – a target that we must meet in order to do our part to prevent the worst impacts of global warming. Massachusetts also has yet to set a new target for emission reductions for 2030, which is now just 15 years away.

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