Go Solar Massachusetts

90 percent of our energy comes from dirty, dangerous sources…

Here in Massachusetts, most of our energy comes from burning coal, oil and gas to heat and power our homes. Our environment and our health pay the price: these sources emit air pollution that causes smog and global warming, as well as mercury pollution that contaminates our waterways and makes our fish unsafe to eat.

… but we can change that with 50,000 new solar roofs in Massachusetts in the next decade.

With major environmental and health problems caused by dirty energy, Massachusetts needs to get serious about going solar. We’ve already made great progress. Since the state’s current solar program was enacted we’ve seen a 46- fold increase in the number of solar installations in just five years. But we can do even better.

We have a goal of getting solar panels installed on 50,000 rooftops by 2020 and on 150,000 roofs by 2030.

Powerful industries stand in the way

Some Massachusetts power companies and their fossil fuel friends are attempting to block homeowners and businesses’ from maximizing solar keeping us dependent on the polluting fuels of the past.

Their allies in the Statehouse are blocking the expansion of successful solar programs— programs that will help us reach our goal of 50,000 solar roofs by 2020 and 150,000 solar roofs by 2030.

We can clean up our air and water, keep our families healthier, and reduce our global warming pollution, by getting more of our electricity from the sun. But it will take the action and support of people like you to make it happen.

Together, we can overcome the polluter opposition and help Massachusetts go solar

Thanks to our members and supporters, we’re fighting for a solar-powered future. In just the past year we’ve written two reports making the case for expanding our solar programs. We’ve built a strong coalition of more than 60 clean energy businesses that support our legislation. And we’ve helped pass pro-solar resolutions in communities across the state, including Cambridge, Salem Greenfield and other communities across the state. Together, we’re building the groundswell of public support it will take to win.

Join our campaign and send Gov. Patrick a message today.

Repower Massachusetts with clean energy

Report | Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center

Shining Cities

Solar power is on the rise across America—increasing 200-fold in the United States since 2002 — and major cities are helping to lead this clean energy revolution. Shining Cities: At the Forefront of America’s Solar Energy Revolution shows that cities from every region of the U.S. are driving solar development with strong public policies, reaping important benefits for the environment, public health, and the economy. By building local solar power, cities can keep more of their energy budget at home and create good local jobs.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center

Shalefield Stories

Across the country, fracking is contaminating drinking water, making nearby families sick with air pollution, and turning forest acres into industrial zones. Shalefield Stories shares just a few of the stories from people living on the front lines of fracking.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment Massachusetts Research & Policy Center

Moving America Forward

Without prompt action by the United States and others to reduce global warming pollution, catastrophic impacts – from coastal flooding to food system disruptions – could become unavoidable. Fortunately, even in the absence of a comprehensive response from the U.S. Congress, local and state governments and the Obama administration have taken leadership on global warming.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment Massachusetts Research and Policy Center

Death by a Thousand Cuts

Death by a Thousand Cuts exposes the challenges facing the Cape Cod National Seashore, Lowell National Historical Park, and other national parks in Massachusetts as a result of mounting funding cuts to the National Park Service.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment Massachusetts Research and Policy Center

Wind Energy for a Cleaner America II

Burning fossil fuels to generate electricity pollutes our air, contributes to global warming, and consumes vast amounts of water—harming our rivers and lakes and leaving less water for other uses. In contrast, wind energy produces no air pollution, makes no contribution to global warming, and uses no water.

America’s wind power capacity has quadrupled in the last five years and wind energy now generates as much electricity as is used every year in Georgia. To protect the environment, federal and state governments should continue and expand policies that support wind energy.

> Keep Reading

Pages

View AllRSS Feed